Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Radiotherapy Extension
Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Radiotherapy Extension

Client
  • RG Carter

Value
  • £4m

Rossi Long Consulting provided Civil and Structural engineering services for the extension to the existing radiotherapy department at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital under a design and build contract with the contractor RG Carter. The new single storey building is built into the embankment of the helicopter landing pad and connects to the existing radiotherapy department via a new link corridor. The building includes two new LINAC (Linear Accelerator) Bunkers, an orthovoltage treatment room, consultation rooms, waiting area, ancillary facilities and a roof top plant room.

 

The building was constructed using a steel frame with a composite concrete roof slab and a mixture of external materials including brickwork, curtain wall glazing and cladding panels. The bunkers are constructed using reinforced concrete up to 2.7m thick to provide a suitable level of radiation shielding supported by a concrete raft slab foundation. The development also includes the design and provision of a new helipad.

 

Rossi Long Consulting brought a number of innovative design solutions to this project including the following:

  • Relocation of the proposed link corridor connection to the existing building to avoid very costly tunnelling works originally proposed. 
  • The use of Building Information Modeling through development of a coordinated building model with the architect. 
  • Extensive research, in conjunction with a concrete technology specialist, to develop a highly efficient design method of crack control for the concrete bunker that significantly reduced the reinforcement tonnage required (approximately 40%) compared to traditional methods. 
  • The steel frame was designed to allow the bunker to be constructed in parallel, reducing the construction programme and avoiding potential clashes at the structural interface. 

 

In 2014, the project received a craftmanship award from the Norfolk Association of Architects.